Maponyane, “Our War Cry is “We Have Had Enough” (ZACF, TAAC) (2017)

OUR WAR CRY IS “WE HAVE HAD ENOUGH” Bongani Maponyane (ZACF/ TAAC) 13 July 2017 Recent repression in South Africa, like the sentencing of four protestors from Boiketlong township to 16 years in jail for alleged violence, shows what we face. The black working class is victimised and unfairly charged. This is due to the fights and popular unrest in township communities, against unfair, corrupt, … Continue reading Maponyane, “Our War Cry is “We Have Had Enough” (ZACF, TAAC) (2017)

ZACF: Free the Boiketlong 4! Remember and Revive the Militant Tradition of September 3, 1984! (ZACF)

Remember and Revive the Militant Tradition of September 3, 1984! (ZACF)

Free the Boiketlong 4! No more banning orders!

6 September 2017

On 3 September 1984, the Vaal Triangle, which is located southeast of Johannesburg and was part of the industrial heartland of South Africa, exploded into unrest. A general stay-away from work was called, schools were closed, buses and taxis stood idle and militant protest spread across the country. It was the most significant and large-scale rebellion of the black working class since the Soweto Uprising of June, 1976, and signified one of the final nails in the coffin of apartheid and white minority rule.

For the black working class living in the townships across the Vaal Triangle, such as Sharpeville, Sebokeng, Evaton, Bophelong, Boiketlong, Zamdela and others the conditions were very similar to those of today. A slump in the steel industry had led to many workers being retrenched, there were evictions of rent defaulters and bribery, corruption and self-enrichment of local councillors was rife. Councillors’ Continue reading “ZACF: Free the Boiketlong 4! Remember and Revive the Militant Tradition of September 3, 1984! (ZACF)”

Hattingh, “The South African state’s 2012 budget” (2012)

From ZCommunications here

The South African state’s 2012 budget

By

Hattingh, ” Class war and imperialism in Greece” (2012)

From ZCommunications here

Class war and imperialism in Greece

Hattingh, “Venezuela and the ‘Bolivarian Revolution’: Beacon of hope or smoke and mirrors?” (2012)

From ZCommunications here 

Venezuela and the ‘Bolivarian Revolution’: Beacon of Hope or Smoke and Mirrors?

by Shawn Hattingh (ZACF)

April 23, 2012

Introduction

For many people on the left, within and outside of Southern Africa, the ‘Bolivarian Revolution’ is seen as a beacon of socialist hope in a sea of capitalist despair [1]. The reason why many leftists feel so strongly attached to this project, and promote it as an alternative, is because they have come to view it as a move by the Venezuelan state towards creating a genuine, free form of socialism [2] or at the very least an experiment that profoundly breaks with the tenets of neo-liberalism [3] [4]. Many articles have, therefore, been written lauding the state’s nationalisation of some industries [5], its land distribution programmes [6], and its attempts to supposedly create participatory democracy in workplaces (through co-management and co-operatives) [7] and in communities (through community councils) [8]. Linked to this, a great deal has also been made of the state using some of revenue generated by the Petróleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) to roll out social services such as education, subsidised foodstuffs and healthcare [9]. Much ink has, consequently, been spilt arguing that all of these are socialist inspired moves and passionate calls have been made for other states, like the South African state, to adopt Venezuelan style ‘Socialism for the Twenty First Century’ [10].

This article, however, questions the assumption that the Venezuelan state is embarking upon a path to create a truly egalitarian and free socialist society. It will, therefore, be argued that Venezuela is not in a transitional phase to socialism; rather it is a capitalist country where the private sector and important state-owned companies seek to maximise profits. Indeed, it will be argued that while some welfare is handed out by the state, this often sits side by side with other policies that are outright neo-liberal. In order to make the argument that Venezuela cannot be considered as heading in a socialist direction, this article will engage and examine issues around the state’s nationalisation programme, its relations to multinational corporations, its community councils project and its social service programmes. Coupled to this, the nature of the economy will be looked at, including ownership patterns, and it will be critically considered whether or not the relations of production that define capitalism are being transformed into more socialist relations based on direct democracy, mutual aid and self-management in workplaces and communities. In fact, it will be argued, from an anarchist perspective, that unfortunately relations that define class rule and capitalism are not being eroded away by the ‘Bolivarian Revolution’: instead of an egalitarian society arising, it will be considered how and why an elite still exploit and oppress the working class. It will, therefore, be critically considered how and why class rule and capitalism, and even elements of neo-liberal capitalism, in Venezuelan society are not in the process of being eroded away. Far from being a beacon of hope the ‘Bolivarian process’ may be more correctly identified as a case of smoke and mirrors.

The Quagmire of the ‘Bolivarian Revolution’s’ Rhetoric

There is no doubt that both the supporters and opponents of the ‘Bolivarian Revolution’ feel passionately about the figure of Hugo Chavez and place him firmly at the centre of the ‘revolution’. Continue reading “Hattingh, “Venezuela and the ‘Bolivarian Revolution’: Beacon of hope or smoke and mirrors?” (2012)”

Hattingh, “Sugar Coating Exploitation” (2012)

From ZCommunications here

Sugar Coating Explotation

Hattingh, ” South Africa’s rulers have blood on their hands, again” (2013)

From ZCommunications here

South Africa’s rulers have blood on their hands, again

 

A few notes on the Anarchist Awareness League and the Durban Anarchist Federation – 1993-2003

The Anarchist Awareness League was formed in Durban in 1993. It was mainly involved in publishing leaflets, pamphlets and posters. At some point it became part of a new Durban Anarchist Federation, along with a “green” and feminist collective. In 1997 the Anarchist Awareness League was re-established. Renamed the Anarchist Workers Collective (AWC), it joined the Workers Solidarity Federation (WSF) that year. there had been … Continue reading A few notes on the Anarchist Awareness League and the Durban Anarchist Federation – 1993-2003

Interview: Alan Lipman, 2008, “Xenophobia, Nationalism and Greedy Bosses: An Interview with Alan Lipman”

Alan Lipman, 2008, “Xenophobia, Nationalism and Greedy Bosses: An Interview with Alan Lipman,” Zabalaza: A Journal of Southern African Revolutionary  Anarchism, #9, pp. 12-13. For more on Alan Lipman, see here and here. Get the PDF here. Introduction: Alan Lipman served as an early member of the underground SACP, which had been re-established in 1953 after its predecessor, the CPSA, was outlawed in 1950. He … Continue reading Interview: Alan Lipman, 2008, “Xenophobia, Nationalism and Greedy Bosses: An Interview with Alan Lipman”

Alan Robert Lipman, South Africa (1925-2013) (by Lucien van der Walt)

Alan Robert Lipman, South Africa (1925-2013) By Lucien van der Walt, 2017, for Southern African Anarchist & Syndicalist History Alan Robert Lipman, born 6 June 1925 to a Jewish South African family, and raised in Johannesburg and Vrede, passed away on the 27 January 2013.[1] He trained as an architect at the University of the Witwatersrand following a stint in the South African military in … Continue reading Alan Robert Lipman, South Africa (1925-2013) (by Lucien van der Walt)

Talk: Alan Lipman, 2006, “The Anti-Liberation Movements”

Introduction: This is an edited version of a talk given by veteran communist Alan Lipman who participated in drawing up the Freedom Charter in 1955, about why he left the South African Communist Party (SACP) and the African National Congress (ANC), subsequently becoming an anarchist. He was addressing a two-day workshop held by the Zabalaza Anarchist Communist Front (ZACF) at the invitation of the now … Continue reading Talk: Alan Lipman, 2006, “The Anti-Liberation Movements”

Photo: enduring anarchist, ZACF message at Motsoaledi squatter camp, Soweto, 2017

Ten years ago, comrades and friends of the Zabalaza Anarchist Communist Front / Black Action Group / Phambili Motsoaledi Community Project, then active in Motsoaledi squatter camp in Soweto, painted a large mural for “Land and Freedom.” Although ZACF is no longer active in the area, the mural endures, as a recent photo attests:   Continue reading Photo: enduring anarchist, ZACF message at Motsoaledi squatter camp, Soweto, 2017